Last night’s NYS mayoral primary elections begin to reveal pro-police candidates are in demand

In Rochester, NY, Mayor Lovely Warren lost her election to the more police friendly candidate Malik Evans in a near landslide.

On Biden’s Speech to Congress

Photo Credit: Getty

Last night President Joe Biden delivered his first speech to Congress saying “America is on the move again’, while noting the nation is at an ‘inflection point’ too.

The moment calls for more spending the President argues.

Massive spending actually.

In the amount of another proposed $2.25 trillion in infrastructure spending, and another $1.8 trillion in a family safety net, and that’s in addition to the recent $1.9 trillion stimulus.

Republicans quickly jumped to attack Biden’s ambition plans of driving up America’s debt by $6 trillion.

This blog comes at policy from a fiscally conservative, business minded standpoint. The notion that America needs to spend trillions on unnecessary big government programs and drive up our national debt to compete in the 21st Century, while China is trapped in 300% debt to GDP ratio is to be nice, at best impractical.

Saddling down future generations with high debt interest payments will make USA unflexible, stagnant, and bloated.

While I’m not opposed to government spending on legit infrastructure to rebuild roads, airports, bridges to best compete in the 21st Century, I’d want to make sure we only spend what we need out of that projected $300 to $600 billion that actually makes sense. If we can do infrastructure for $200 billion, even better.

Most of what President Biden proposed last night will be DOA in the Senate.

Politicians should stop overpromising what they can’t deliver, and focus on what taxpayers (We The People) want to spend taxpayer $$$ on to improve the nation.

New Second Amendment Case Granted Cert by Supreme Court

New 2021
SCOTUS Justice Group Photo

When it comes to gun rights/gun control narratives, the media and opposing political establishment has it out for the Second Amendment.

Here’s the key talking points of what just happened yesterday:

Issue as SCOTUS defines it: “Whether the state of New York’s denial of petitioners’ applications for concealed-carry licenses for self-defense violated the Second Amendment.”

In non legal terms, can a state restrict a person’s right to get licensed to carry a firearm outside the home, based on the requirement of demonstrating “proper cause” for self-defense?

Even through the balance of power for the Second Amendment far outweighs political opposition, with the news that SCOTUS has accepted NYS Rifle & Pistol v. Corlett, this is seen as a case that could potentially be a landmark ruling, advancing gun rights in a major way, nationwide.

Not since District of Columbia v. Heller has the Supreme Court weighed in on a major Second Amendment case, and with this new case, SCOTUS has the potential to do four things:

1. Strike down the NYS restrictive concealed carry law that requires a person to demonstrate ‘proper cause’ for self defense.

2. Clarify the court’s stance on 2A, and concealed carry.

3. Set precedent on gun rights for American citizens, both in and outside their homes.

4. Establish new standards for review on gun rights cases.

The case will likely be argued later this Fall, with a ruling expected by or before June 2022.

In coming media segments on this SCOTUS case over the next year, credible gun right’s experts have an opportunity to educate and drive clarity on 2A realities.

Texas is Freezing. Renewable Energy Planning Appears to be a Big Part of the Problem

Some of us knew an extreme storm was going to hit Texas and surrounding states hard for days now. At the peak, five million were without power, and brutal cold (and snow) are hovering over the state, much of the region, and this is just day two of what will likely be a five day extreme weather event, with another big storm impacting Texas beginning tomorrow.

We are beginning to learn why Texans have seen such a dramatic loss of energy during part one of this storm, which is directly impacted by both the failure of renewable energy, and to be fair as Texas Govenor Abbott notes, “The ability of some companies that generate the power has been frozen. This includes the natural gas & coal generators.”

Word of the street is:

MichaelPalmerTWC: What’s happening in Texas is entirely predictable. A direct result of over investment in unreliable energy like wind and solar, and then not expanding reliable energy sources like natural gas and nuclear to meet an ever growing demand for that energy.

As I sit here with my kids freezing, I really don’t give a crap about your attempts to save face for the renewable energy sector. I lived in many places in the US including cold states and never have had to experience this. We lost power and heat when it was needed the most.— GalvestonChaser (@davis_wx) February 16, 2021

With the Biden Administration’s drive to tackle Climate Change, now is the time to have a national debate.

I would support the transition to a ‘balanced’ hydrogen economy by 2070. Wind and solar are fine on a small scale, but a sophisticated empire can’t rely on unreliable sources of energy. It takes a good 40 to 50 years to transition to a clean energy economy.

Possible, a once in a century weather event.

Thoughts on the George Floyd Case and Due Process

The video imagery of the George Floyd arrest on May 25, 2020 while Floyd appeared to be foaming at the mouth, while in a neck restraint was both disturbing and horrible to watch.

That said, I’m in the tiny minority that doesn’t believe what happened to George Floyd was excessive police force, or murder. I also believe the four police officers were trained and skilled, and were doing their job, and this case has zero to do with racism. The national uprising that led to riots and unrest could have been avoided had everyone let due process play out, and evidence weighed.

In America, we have ‘Due Process’ and presumption of innocence deeply embedded in our legal system. This means, the law (and Constitution) give the accused the right to fair treatment during the legal process, and allow the process of evidence to be compiled and objectively reviewed.

The lead video (there were three public videos, and activated police body cams) of George Floyd show one angle of the arrest, and neck restraint. Other video angles add to the evidence, and there were three autopsy reports, and a criminal complaint with a progression of documented events anyone interested in the case should read.

I’m arguing George Floyd was possibly having a heart attack during the arrest, while resisting arrest, and likely died of a health condition, and not from the neck restraint. The autopsy reports list heart disease, heavy drug use, and no evidence of strangulation from the neck restraint, which is listed a non deadly force option in the Minneapolis Police Department Policy & Procedure Manual.

On the initial 911 call, there was legit concern George Floyd was under the influence of some kind of substance when the alleged crime was committed, and during the time of arrest.

Yesterday the body cam transcripts were released. What is most interesting is while Floyd was standing (not on the ground in the restraint yet), officers observed foam on Floyd’s mouth. Also, at one point it was suggested maybe Floyd was on the drug PCP, a point I argued on May 28. Though PCP is not listed as a substance in the autopsy reports. Point is, Floyd was on a strong enough drug (Fentanyl and Methamphetamine listed on autopsy) that officers noticed shaking of the eyes, and the behavior of someone who just wasn’t acting right.

All this is important to the case, and while initial evidence was quickly overlooked to drive a reform agenda, now we wait for a trial (scheduled for March 2021), so evidence can be submitted and weighed.

‘How Dwight D. Eisenhower Quickly Contained the Spanish Flu at Camp Colt (Gettysburg) in 1918’

‘How Dwight D. Eisenhower Quickly Contained the Spanish Flu at Camp Colt (Gettysburg) in 1918’

The story I am about to tell has been sitting in a few books (documented for any future reader) on my bookshelves for years.

Also, it is well documented the pandemic of 1918 was known as the Spanish Flu, just as in 2020, some call it the Chinese Virus (or Wuhan Virus). As it is now clear, the obsession with racism made Coronavirus cases in Italy and New York City EXPLODE, so I find accusations of racism over the use of a flu origin to be both ridiculous, ignorant, and dangerous!

In 1969, The Washington Post would say of Eisenhower after he died (March 28,1969), “It could be argued that the General is the greatest figure in American and world history.”

In the final eight months of World War l, just as his military career was getting started, Eisenhower arrived at Camp Colt (on March 24), and turned a Gettysburg battlefield into a tank corps, where Eisenhower would command 10,605 men to train them to fight overseas in World War l.

From 1918 to 1919, over 500,000 Americans died from Spanish Flu. 50 to 100 million died, globally.

In 1918, while some say a first case of the pandemic in USA was reported in Kansas, I’m going with the Spanish Flu entered USA through a port in Boston, and made it’s way to Fort Devens, Massachusetts, where the first case was reported on Sept 8, 1918.

Soon after, 124 men (many infected) in Fort Devens were transferred to Camp Colt, where Eisenhower was in command.

As men in Camp Colt (Gettysburg) began getting ill, initially camp doctors thought the cause for the sickness was aftereffects of inoculations. It took about 24 hours to identify it was indeed the Spanish Flu.

Eisenhower and his chief surgeon Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Scott moved quick to isolate the patients into tents. No more than four men per tent.

On Eisenhower’s order, Camp Colt was quarantined. Not the town of Gettysburg. Just Camp Colt.

What Camp Colt MPs did do, was prevent any soldier that did not have a medical pass from leaving the camp. In the city (town) of Gettysburg, restaurants could not serve soldiers, and Gettysburg churches were off limits to Camp Colt soldiers.

On sunny days, tents where infected men at Camp Colt were quarantined, were opened up, and the bedding was exposed to the sun. They scrubbed the floors daily with Lysol and kerosene. All solders were given a medical examination daily.

Between Sept 15 and Oct 5, 1918 (3 weeks), 427 soldiers were hospitalized, and 175 died. By mid October 1918, the worst had come and gone at Camp Colt.

Less than 2 months after the first Spanish Flu case in USA was reported near Boston, The Gettysburg Times wrote (Oct 24, 1918), Camp Colt was “practically free of influenza”.

175 deaths, and 427 hospitalized out of 10,605 men was a pretty good outcome compared to other Army posts who got hit much harder, and in a nation where over 500,000 people would die from the Spanish Flu in 1918-1919.

The outcome of Eisenhower’s (and Surgeon Scott’s) efforts were so good, that Eisenhower’s leadership of the pandemic at Camp Colt got the attention of the War Department, who wanted to learn what measures Eisenhower took to stop the virus so soon at Camp Colt.

Tomorrow will be the 51st anniversary of Eisenhower’s death, which in 1969 was a huge deal, as is the death of most any President. But at the time, Eisenhower’s passing was a monumental loss to the nation.

On Oct 14, 1918, (Eisenhower’s Birthday) an impressed War Department promoted Eisenhower to Lieutenant Colonel, for his efforts at quickly containing the Spanish Flu at Camp Colt.

Soon after, the War Department sent their new rising star to France, just weeks before World War l ended.

As it turns out, the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic was where the legend of Eisenhower began.

Photos: Eisenhower and Camp Colt

Obamacare Unconstitutional? A Nightmare for Republicans

The world has changed some.

Republicans didn’t lose the House last month to gun control, climate change, or immigration. They got wiped out in the suburbs, and elsewhere by Health care.

2018 Midterms was about Health care. Period.

If last night’s ruling holds, Republicans can weaken themselves electorally in suburbs, and swing states, thereby putting the Republican Presidency at risk in 2020, and losing odds to win back the House.

This isn’t 2010. Health care is now a political winner, and pre-existing conditions are the new Holy Grail of Health Care.

Next time Dems are in power, they’ll push for Medicare-for-all, which would be a disaster.

We’ll see how the coming months go, but at this point, if the Obamacare ruling holds, I’m thinking Congress gives Trump his wall, in exchange for protecting pre-existing conditions.

RT nicholaskitchel: This is the photo taken at the White House right after HouseGOP voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act last year.

Everyone with an ❌ has since been voted out of Congress.

Health Care

A Very Low Burden Of Proof

Last night’s New Yorker hit job was a poorly sourced, very bad piece of journalism.

The allegations from the first accuser Christine Blasey Ford lack any credible substance, and all of her named witnesses (under threat of perjury) don’t even support her claims. The threshold of proof here is so weak, to move forward like this would be devastating for any case, in any court of the land.

It’s now all out media and political warfare on SCOTUS nominee Brett Kavanaugh. And with each passing day comes a slew of ridiculous new allegations, all of which (so far) don’t hold up to the highest legal benchmarks of ‘burden of proof’.

As frivolous allegations of wrongdoing build, the pressure is on to delay the vote for Kavanaugh and ultimately derail his nomination. This is a big mindgame, and the order of the day is to destroy a man’s reputation.

Thursday’s Senate hearing is not a trial, but (if it really happens at this point) it is a forum where evidence will seen and heard, and Senators will critically look at the facts before them to determine if Kavanaugh is fit to serve on the Supreme Court.

I’m skeptical the first accuser Ford will even show up to the hearing Thursday, and betting odds have her showing up at 10% or less now. But if she does show, in the end, Senators will vote with their conscience, based on the evidence presented. And, if Ford is a no show, her credibility will be destroyed.

At a top government level, the highest benchmark for burden of proof should be weighed. This requires any evidence submitted to be:

– Clear and Convincing
– Proves Guilt Beyond a Reasonable Doubt

It is unfortunate that the media is no longer skilled to discern credible vs. uncredible evidence, but in America’s legal system, ‘burden of proof’ is still king.

Guns in America: A Reality Check

America once again finds itself in a fierce national debate over guns. For politicians, gun policy ‘talking points’ are often moving goalposts, as after any mass shooting that shocks the national conscience, the partisan lines are deep and angry.

A significant mass shooting now happens in America about 2x to 4x a year, and the debate lasts for a few days to weeks until all legislative options are exhausted, and the news cycle moves on to the next thing.

Gun control activists will push for whatever legislation is on the table during the most recent mass shooting cycle, and gun rights’ supporters are reluctant to pass new laws, as both sides never see eye to eye.

What’s missing from the gun debate is a dose of reality:

– Guns (handguns, pistols, revolvers), rifles, and modern sporting rifles are not only legal in America, but part of a 200+ year national heritage.

There are about 120 million gun owners (near 40% of the U.S. Population), 400 million guns, and $2 trillion rounds of ammunition in America.

– New laws guns are extremely difficult to pass on the Federal level. This is mainly because of ‘Congressional Voting Districts’, and constituents who simply don’t want to pass new gun laws. America is a Constitutional Republic of 50 states, and each state can pass their own gun laws, if they have the votes.

– To ban guns in America is going to be very, very difficult, and even if in 100 years guns were somehow banned, or the Supreme Court wiped out the Second Amendment, confiscating 400 million guns in a Republic that once repealed prohibition is going to be near impossible.

This is a difficult, emotional debate, and politicians and pundits who can talk about guns in a rational, insightful way, while helping Americans understand policy and reality can craft a media expert niche to discuss gun safety, law, tradition, and policy reality.